David Cameron Wants To Ban ‘Porn Depicting Rape’

What exactly defines ‘rape porn’ to people like David Cameron? Abduction fantasies? BDSM? Power-play? Roleplay? When making such a broad statement, it’s important to take into account the submissive/dominant dynamic and understand that consent is the obvious and crucial (yet vastly overlooked) difference between ‘rape’ and ‘rape porn’.

I understand that at first glance, rape fantasies make little-to-no sense whatsoever. “How could anyone fantasise about something that in real life would be so traumatic and potentially life-threatening?” you might ask. Well… the keyword being fantasy; taken from the dictionary:

  • The faculty or activity of imagining things, esp. things that are impossible or improbable.
  • A fanciful mental image, typically one on which a person dwells at length or repeatedly and which reflects their conscious or unconscious wishes.
  • An idea with no basis in reality.

This psychology blog breaks down and explores the roots of ‘rape fantasy’, giving a perfectly viable and understandable reason behind why it’s such a popular female fantasy — you only have to think back to two years ago and remember the weird success of the Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy for an example;

Rape or near-rape fantasies are central to romance novels, one of the perennial best-selling categories in fiction. These books are often called “bodice-rippers” and have titles like “Love’s Sweet Savage Fury”, which imply at least some degree of force. In them, a handsome cad becomes so overwhelmed by his attraction to the heroine that he loses all control and must have her, even if she refuses–which she does initially, but then eventually melts into submission, desire, and ultimately fulfilment.

Romance novels are often called “porn for women.” Porn is all about sexual fantasies. In porn for men, the fantasy is sexual abundance–eager women who can’t get enough and have no interest in a relationship. In porn for women as depicted in romance novels, the fantasy is to be desired so much that the man loses all control, though he never actually hurts the woman, and in the end, marries her.

Do not let the word ‘rape’ steer you off course — this fantasy all depicts the same; a forceful dominant ‘taking advantage’ of the helpless submissive. A consensual simulation of a surprisingly common sexual fantasy; 31% to 57% of women (roughly the same as 4 in 10) have had one at some point in their lives.

It is not the same as an actual rape — and going so far as to criminalise and condemn it as such is pretty ridiculous.

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